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Embodiment

What I Can Bear to Remember about Academic Job Video Interviews

It’s that season again: Skype and Zoom links are being clicked through in email inboxes, along with actual phone numbers being dialed, in order to participate in preliminary academic job interviews. Many friends and colleagues I know and love are aching through the process of those interviews (as well as on-campus interviews–go, peeps, go). I too once carefully created a convincing-enough library behind me, selected my shirt and jacket much more carefully than the pants no one could see under my desk, and tested my Wifi connection about a thousand times while shakily breathing over my Mac. I wished this process would be easier and, eventually, I found it to be easier by approaching the interviews differently and with different preparation techniques. In fact, once I figured out and then took up a handful of practices, I felt a greater sense of trust in myself as a scholar and determined …

Appearing on the BBC World Services

I am honored to share that insights from my research were heard around the world for two minutes on August 23rd, 2016, in the BBC World Services “Beyond Binary” documentary. If you care to listen me especially, I am a minute 10. You can hear me speak about my new research on trans use of Tumblr. For about two years, I’ve been collecting data on the use of the #ftm hashtag and, for a shorter time, #mtf hashtag on Tumblr. I came upon the world of trans Tumblr, as I call it, in 2010 when I was choosing my own new name. I found a tightly-knit network of trans people who are otherwise unanchored through their geographic diaspora. You can click here to read more about that research project.

Here’s more on the “Beyond Binary” documentary from the BBC World Services website: In communities around the globe, non-binary …

Sharing My MA Thesis: Aggression in the Quaker Meeting for Worship


Over ten years ago, I spent a year pursuing the role of the instinct for aggression–the instinct to act, behave, take part, stand up, speak out, and so on–in my masters thesis, “’Ecstasy Has Been Given to the Tiger:’ Aggression in the Quaker Meeting for Worship,” which I share below.

ABSTRACT. Together, aggression and Quakerism are two seemingly disparate aspects of the intersection of psychiatry and religion. Society generally encourages disavowing aggression because of its incitement of and pairing with hatred and violence. Quakerism is branded at the other end of the spectrum as entirely passive for its silence (in the worship service) and dedication to peace (evident in its renowned social justice efforts). Yet aggression and Quakerism are intrinsically and necessarily intertwined for any religion’s healthy survival. Drawing upon work by Winnicott, Holbrook, and Ulanov to theorize the place of aggression in Quaker Meeting, I use William James’ method …

Talk on 10/2: Queering the Map

I’m over the moon that 1) I do not have the flu as I did last February when I had to cancel this talk, and 2) I finally get to give this talk at my alma mater with the brilliant, wonderful people at the Futures Initiative. It will be great to share my thoughts on selecting the right tool to fit the right public humanities project, particularly in regards to multiple layers of data analysis and collaboration in my Queer Public Archives project. The detailed abstract is below.

WHERE: The Graduate Center, 365 Fifth Avenue
ROOM:   9204-9205
WHEN:   October 2, 2015, 2:00 PM-4:00 PM
CONTACT INFO: futuresinitiative [at] gc.cuny.edu; (212) 817-7201
WATCH ONLINE: http://bit.ly/futuresed-live
RSVP NOW
HASHTAG: #futuresED

In The Practice of Everyday Life, de Certeau writes that “What the map cuts up, the story cuts across.” But what if the everyday stories you seek are already cut up

New Publication: Crossing Over into Territories of the Body (Area)

I am pleased to report that my new article in Area, “Crossing Over into Territories of the Body: Urban Territories, Borders, and Lesbian-Queer Bodies in New York City,” is available via preview! As I am unable to pay the $3k-$5k fee to make this article open access (per the Wiley-Blackwell requirement to do so), you can (legally) download a pre-print version of the article for free by clicking here are on the image to the left. Enjoy! The abstract is also below. Many thanks to Sara H. Smith and her student colleagues who brought to life the AAG 2012 sessions on bodies, borders, and territories together and this following special issue.

2015. Gieseking, J. Crossing Over into Territories of the Body: Urban Territories, Borders, and Lesbian-Queer Bodies in New York City. Area. doi: 10.1111/area.12147.

Abstract: The geopolitical focus on territory as a fixed and cohesive nation-state simultaneously conceals …

Queer and Urban Reflections on St. Petersburg BUKA Alumni Meeting


The following is a post I recently shared with the American Friends of Alexander von Humboldt Foundation blog in reflection to the German Chancellor Fellow / Bundeskanzler-Stipendium (BUKA) Alumni Meeting in Saint Petersburg, Russia, in November 2014.

I doubt I can express how honored, nervous, and excited I was to attend the BUKA Meeting in St. Petersburg this fall. However, as a BUKA, I persist.

The sense of honor came from having been selected as an American representative at the Russian gathering. I admire a lot of the research emerging in the Russian social sciences, a passion that developed through my conversations as a BUKA with Dr. Olga Sveshnikova, Visiting Scholar in the Research Centre for East European Studies at the University of Bremen. Her work examines the culture of Soviet-era anthropological digs as a production of Soviet myth and history. Sveshnikova’s project always fascinated me and left …

Visualizing ‘Queer Exchange’ Friendships


I am increasingly interested in the social networks of queers, broadly and self-defined. One of the largest queer groups on Facebook that I know of is the Facebook group Queer Exchange with 7,855 members as of December 1, 2013. Each node or dot represents a person and the lines or edges indicate the friendships between them. Rather than a top-down culture, Queer Exchange repeats the interwoven and overlapping descriptions of queer spaces and lives that have described lgbtq life across cities, states, and times. In other words, many cultures often demonstrate relationships and dynamics that show some dominant voices overtaking others, or friends being connected to only one other person so they wander on the periphery. Instead this graph shows an interwoven society.

If you click the here or on the graph below, you can interact with the social network analysis graph of Queer Exchange I created.

Social media sites …

Reflecting on “Identity Work and Identity Play Online” #2013ASA

Livetweets from"Identity Work and Identity Play Online" with @Greene_DM, @lportwoodstacer, @anitaconchita, @lnakamur, & @tmcphers at #ASA2013. Link to the panel info can be found here: http://convention2.allacademic.com/one/theasa/theasa13/index.php?click_key=1&cmd=Multi+Search+Search+Load+Session&s

Collecting Data, Que(e)rying the SpaceTime of the Lesbian Herstory Archives

On founding the Lesbian Herstory Archives:
Deb Edel: We began talking about how easily our history had gotten lost.
Joan Nestle: That we didn’t want our story told by quote “a patriarchal history keeper.”  I didn’t want our story told by those who told us we were freaks to begin with.
Deb: If we didn’t do it, nobody was gonna do it for us.
Joan: This wasn’t gonna be a one night stand.  This was gonna be a long-term relationship. We had a commitment to the archives that…it had to be a lifetime commitment… If an archives doesn’t outlast at least one generation it’s not an archives. … This was an archives who belonged to the people who lived its history. (Lesbian Herstory Archives 2009)

There is a need for lgbtq people to unearth and even create their own history, especially lesbians and queer women who face erasures of their …

Digital Geographies, Geographies of Digitalia (an AAG Call for Papers)


As a critical cultural and urban geographer, feminist and queer theorist, and digital studies scholar, I find it difficult to place my work and interests in both critical digital and computational studies within the way that #geoweb is presently formed and discussed. Even with my passion for the outcomes, algorithms, and politics of GIS; my work in mental mapping and adoration for environment behavior mapping, transect walks; and other spatial methods and analytics has shown repeatedly that non-GIS methods and analytics are overlooked in the field and beyond. At the same time, conceptualizations of computationnew media, data mining, and data visualization continue to expand the possibilities for spatiodigital research methods and analytics and the very meanings of these endeavors, but geography’s contribution to these areas remains fixed to certain, long-term ways of framing these terms all the while contributing to their development. As the digitalia around …

Announcing the Our Queer Lives & Space (#OQLS) Project


Our Queer Lives and Spaces (#OQLS) Project is a living queer archive that affords lgbtqtstsi a space to map & share their stories in their own words and images. Read more about & join the project here: http://jgieseking.org/CLAGSqNY/oqls/.

oqls flyer2

“Queer(ing) New York”: Education for Change, on May Day and Beyond


The CLAGS Seminar in the City that I am teaching, “Queer(ing) New York,” will begin this evening, May 1st. Since creating this course, a lot of activists have wondered why we would choose to begin on International Worker’s Day. I see May Day as not only the right to work but the right to learn and to know. Free, open, and accessible education–like Queer(ing) New York–must instead be made common and therefore part of our public commons.

Courses like this are the ways we can reimagine education, and also reimagine and enact equality. Lgbtq people live through and walk through absences everyday, ranging from issues of recognition to acceptance, from using bathrooms to using the subway, from the bar that used to be there but closed to the home that used to be there but doesn’t count you as family anymore. As a group that lives the marginalization …

After #TtW13, and on Bodies and Bits


I had a riveting weekend helping to coordinate and preside over a session at Theorizing the Web 2013 (#TtW13). I massively enjoyed presiding over the “Bodies and Bits” panel. These papers tackled those questions close to my heart and always in my mind. How do we invoke the body in the digital? Where does the cyborg begin and end? I have another post forthcoming on my thoughts connecting this fantastic work of the presenters to my own work. In the meantime, you can watch a recording of the livestream from our room–we kicked off at the 2hr40min mark.

Bodies and Bits | Room B | #b3

Presider:   Jen Jack Gieseking   @jgieseking

Hashtag Moderator:   Donald W. Taylor II   @donaldtaylorii

Panelists:

Christina Dunbar-Hester   ‘The Internet Is A Series Of (Fallopian) Tubes’: “Diversity” Activism in Hacker and Software Projects

Gina Neff & co-authored by Brittany Fiore-Silfvast   @ginasue   What We Talk About When We …