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Race & Racism

U.S. National Park Service Essays on LGBTQ History Released

WOOHOO! The LGBTQ America: A Theme Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer History theme study has been released by the U.S. National Park Service of the Department of the Interior for National Coming Out Day! Happy coming out, National Parks!!!

Who made this happen? (Queen) Megan Springate is a kind, brilliant scholar who works on queer archaeology (that’s a thing! and it’s such a cool thing!) and she truly led the effort to bring this to life. There are dozens of authors involved. And what was my role? Besides serving as a peer reviewer for many, many essays, my own essay, “LGBTQ Spaces and Places,” is meant to be a really wide-ranging piece that allows those unfamiliar with LGBTQ geographies and pushing thinking beyond the notion that all “gay” people live and/or hang out in gay neighborhoods in cities, and just adoreeee bars. Amen. I account for the …

Interviewed for “Home Games: The Strange Overlapping Borders of Sports Fandom”

Rick Paulas is a fantastic journalist who is as enthralled with environmental psychology as I am. We recently spoke about the way notions of geography and identity are co-produced by and evident in “Home Games: The Strange Overlapping Borders of Sports Fandom.” I rarely get a chance to discuss athletics so that — coming from a NESCAC school where *surely* we will *finally* beat Amherst for the football title this year, i.e. go, Trin! — it was a special pleasure to contribute to thinking on this topic.

 

Publication: Review of “Safe Space” for Gender, Place and Culture

My review of Christina Hanhardt‘s utterly delicious Safe Space: Gay Neighborhood History and the Politics of Violence is available online and below (OA) in Gender, Place and Culture. When I say “delicious,” this is a spot on description for an important, beautiful work of lgbtq geographical history. I include the first two paragraphs below–you can read the entire publication here. (I was going to put it up on SSRN, only to find out, depressingly and shockingly, that it has been sold to the evil and most profitable-upon-academic-unpaid labor company Elsevier.)

Christina B. Hanhardt writes in Safe Space: Gay Neighborhood History and the Politics of Violence that one cannot “fully understand changing spatial development patterns apart from LGBT politics” (9). Geographers everywhere should take heed and would do well to read this book. Drawing upon Hanhardt’s insightful text will prove an exciting way to incorporate geographies of sexuality …

Teaching Queer America

Trinity College Queer America students visiting the Christopher Street Piers in New York City. CC BY-NC Jack Gieseking 2016.Trinity College Queer America students visiting the Christopher Street Piers in New York City.       CC BY-NC Jack Gieseking 2016.

This spring I taught two incredibly exciting courses. The senior seminar, Queer America, was comprised of a small group of students, primarily from our American Studies program. This is my second senior seminar at Trinity College and my first full-semester lgbtq studies course. Of course, the latter is the more shocking of these components: all of this queering I’ve been up to and I’m only just achieving this beautiful moment. I taught Queer(ing) New York with the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies with their Seminar in the Series course in 2013.

The course was framed around the following questions: What is queer about America? What can be and has been queered about America? What, if anything, is not queer about America?

I was really energized and excited to see …

New Publication: “Urban Margins on the Move” in Berlin Blätter

My short reflection piece, “Urban Margins on the Move: Rethinking LGBTQ Inclusion by Queering the Place of the Gayborhood,” is now out in the Berlin Blätter with a focus on the shifting relationships between the center and margin, both material and metaphorical. I address this idea through the lens of LGBTQ neighborhoods, gentrification, and the work of feminist theorist bell hooks. The full text of the piece, as it is so short, is pasted below. Enjoy!

2015. Gieseking, J. Urban Margins on the Move: Rethinking LGBTQ Inclusion by Queering the Place of the Gayborhood. Berliner Blätter – Ethnographische und ethnologische Beiträge, 68, 43-35.

Urban Margins on the Move: Rethinking LGBTQ Inclusion by Queering the Place of the Gayborhood

Jen Jack Gieseking

We could enter that world but we could not live there. We had always to return to the margin, to cross the tracks to shacks and abandoned

Interviewed for “Mental Maps & the Neuroscience of Neighborhood Blight” in Pacific Standard

I was recently quoted in Rick Paulas’ “Mental Maps and the Neuroscience of Neighborhood Blight” for Pacific Standard. It’s incredibly exciting to see critical geographic work in the public eye.

I excerpt the selections where I was interviewed from the end of the article below:

For a contemporary example of this phenomenon, check out the media’s portrayal of the Black Lives Matter movement. Protests become riots, protestors become thugs, dramatic images of broken windows and burning cars are beamed to white, middle-class viewers who have never been inside the neighborhoods being covered. “[Viewers] presume the neighborhoods are violent,” says Jack Jen Gieseking, a postdoctoral fellow in New Media and Data Visualization at Bowdoin College. “And blame the people within them rather than thinking about how those neighborhoods got that way.” …

Racist practices like redlining, used from the 1930s through the ’60s to deny loans, insurance, supermarkets, and health coverage …

Storify of Cindi Katz’s #AAG2015 James Blaut Award & Memorial Lecture

To honor Jim Blaut's efforts, the award will recognize a scholar who, over the course of her/his life, has used a geographic and historical analysis of capitalism to explain current social injustices and inequalities, and promoted activism against oppressive power relations both within and outside the academy. Award winner Cindi Katz is Professor of Geography in Environmental Psychology & Women’s Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Sharing AERA Panel Video: “Toward What Justice?”

This session brings together compelling scholars within diverse intellectual traditions in educational research to discuss corresponding and sometimes competing definitions of justice. Each panelist will respond to a set of questions designed to reveal the salient points of convergence and difference between Indigenous studies, critical disabilities studies, critical race studies, immigration and border studies, and queer studies in education. A noted critical discussant will synthesize perspectives, offer ideas for future inquiry, and prompt further discussion between the panelists.

Teaching the Geographic Political Economies of Ferguson

My esteemed and inspiring colleague, Kate Driscoll Derickson at UMN, sent around an email of her favorite teaching resources. There are so many of these resources out there but I thought a list with an explanation of what each of these resources affords the student or instructor was worth sharing. I found all of these sources incredibly helpful for prepping my own brief lecture on #Ferguson at Bowdoin today.
Updated 12/4/14: My equally esteemed and inspiring colleague, Josh Inwood at UTN, co-wrote an incredible political, economic, and cultural geographic analysis, “Remembering the Real Violence in Ferguson.” As Inwood and his colleagues write, “More specifically we highlight how the broader media focus on the “rioting” and “looting” in the aftermath of the police shooting deflects attention from the actually existing structures of violence that permit such killings.  This deflection is indicative of the ongoing legacies of traditional (mis)understandings of …

Reflecting on “Identity Work and Identity Play Online” #2013ASA

Livetweets from"Identity Work and Identity Play Online" with @Greene_DM, @lportwoodstacer, @anitaconchita, @lnakamur, & @tmcphers at #ASA2013. Link to the panel info can be found here: http://convention2.allacademic.com/one/theasa/theasa13/index.php?click_key=1&cmd=Multi+Search+Search+Load+Session&s

Announcing the Our Queer Lives & Space (#OQLS) Project

Our Queer Lives and Spaces (#OQLS) Project is a living queer archive that affords lgbtqtstsi a space to map & share their stories in their own words and images. Read more about & join the project here: http://jgieseking.org/CLAGSqNY/oqls/.

oqls flyer2

Publication: Queering the Meaning of Neighborhood

Some time ago now, my chapter “Queering the Meaning of ‘Neighborhood’: Reinterpreting the Lesbian-Queer Experience of Park Slope, Brooklyn, 1983-2008” came out in Michelle Addison and Yvette Taylor’s edited volume, Queer Presences and Absences. After I recently posted about my recent chapter, “Dyked New York: The Space between Geographical Imagination and Materialization of Lesbian–Queer Bars and Neighbourhoods,” being out, I realized that I had never mentioned that my earlier chapter! Oof. I am making note of it now.

As I mentioned, I have put out four neighborhood-related chapters and articles. I also have two recent book reviews out on books examining lgbtq neighborhoods, which I include in this list below. Enjoy!

After #TtW13, and on Bodies and Bits

I had a riveting weekend helping to coordinate and preside over a session at Theorizing the Web 2013 (#TtW13). I massively enjoyed presiding over the “Bodies and Bits” panel. These papers tackled those questions close to my heart and always in my mind. How do we invoke the body in the digital? Where does the cyborg begin and end? I have another post forthcoming on my thoughts connecting this fantastic work of the presenters to my own work. In the meantime, you can watch a recording of the livestream from our room–we kicked off at the 2hr40min mark.

Bodies and Bits | Room B | #b3

Presider:   Jen Jack Gieseking   @jgieseking

Hashtag Moderator:   Donald W. Taylor II   @donaldtaylorii

Panelists:

Christina Dunbar-Hester   ‘The Internet Is A Series Of (Fallopian) Tubes’: “Diversity” Activism in Hacker and Software Projects

Gina Neff & co-authored by Brittany Fiore-Silfvast   @ginasue   What We Talk About When We …

Livestreaming Now: Whiteness & Health Roundtable Today at CUNY Graduate Center

An Exploration of Whiteness and Health A Roundtable Discussion

Follow us here:: http://videostreaming.gc.cuny.edu/videos/video/400/?live=true

The examination of whiteness in the scholarly literature is well established (Fine et al., 1997; Frankenberg, 1993; Hughey, 2010; Twine and Gallagher, 2008). Whiteness, like other racial categories, is socially constructed and actively maintained through the social boundaries by, for example, defining who is white and is not white (Allen, 1994; Daniels, 1997; Roediger, 2007; Wray, 2006). The seeming invisibility of whiteness is one of its’ central mechanisms because it allows those within the category white to think of themselves as simply human, individual and without race, while Others are racialized (Dyer, 1998). We know that whiteness shapes housing (Low, 2009), education (Leonardo, 2009), politics (Feagin, 2012), law (Lopez, 2006), research methods (Zuberi and Bonilla-Silva, 2008) and indeed, frames much of our misapprehension of society (Feagin, 2010; Lipsitz, 1998). Still, we understand little of how whiteness and …